Underground in Brisvegas: can an electronic dance music artist thrive outside the city?
Research and Publications

Underground in Brisvegas: can an electronic dance music artist thrive outside the city?

Dr. Sebastien Darchen published an article in the Conversation on the electronic dance music scene in Brisbane. Full article in the Conversation here:  https://theconversation.com/underground-in-brisvegas-can-an-electronic-dance-music-artist-thrive-outside-the-city-84705 Electronic dance music (EDM) is an increasingly popular music genre. Electronic music can be defined as a sound dominated by electronic instruments and digitally generated sounds and also by digital samples … Continue reading

Forthcoming book on parking by UQ|UP team
News / Research and Publications

Forthcoming book on parking by UQ|UP team

Parking: An International Perspective (Elsevier, 2020) At first sight, parking may seem like a somewhat ‘pedestrian’ topic (pun intended). However, parking is arguably a key component of urban transport and land use systems worldwide. This book (available in 2020) will include parking case studies from more than 20 countries. They will draw together international best … Continue reading

New book chapter on mobilities and the child-friendly city by Laurel Johnson
News / Research and Publications

New book chapter on mobilities and the child-friendly city by Laurel Johnson

Dialogues in Urban and Regional Planning 6 | The Right to the City Edited by Christopher Silver, Robert Freestone, Christophe Demaziere Chapter 9: “Putting Children in the Place on Public Transit: Managing Mobilities in the Child-Friendly City” by Deanna Grant-Smith, Peter Edwards and Laurel Johnson The Dialogues in Urban and Regional Planning series offers a … Continue reading

New paper on the pedestrianization of city centres by Dorina Pojani published in Journal of Urban Design
News / Research and Publications

New paper on the pedestrianization of city centres by Dorina Pojani published in Journal of Urban Design

Abstract: Drawing on personal interviews with local planners, this paper examines barriers to the pedestrianization of city centres in two contrasting settings, one in a Global North city (Brisbane, Australia) and the other in a Global South city (Kathmandu, Nepal). These cases are illuminating because Brisbane already contains a popular three-block pedestrian mall in its … Continue reading

New paper on transport poverty by Dorina Pojani published in Gender, Place, and Culture
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New paper on transport poverty by Dorina Pojani published in Gender, Place, and Culture

Abstract: Tirana, the Balkan capital examined in this study, displays patterns of gendered job search behavior and access, which are unique within contemporary Europe and even within post-socialist Central and Eastern Europe. Here, it is a rather spatially constricted job search range rather than transport poverty that prevents women living in first-ring suburbs from attaining … Continue reading

Computers in Urban Planning and Urban Management Conference
News / Research and Publications

Computers in Urban Planning and Urban Management Conference

The 15th International Conference on Computers in Urban Planning and Urban Management (CUPUM) was hosted by the School of Art, Architecture and Design at the University of South Australia in Adelaide on July 11-14. The theme of CUPUM is using technology for better urban planning and management. Keynote sessions and paper presentations at this conference … Continue reading

Urban food systems: a renewed role for local governments in Australia
Research and Publications

Urban food systems: a renewed role for local governments in Australia

Sonia Roitman and colleagues from the Global Change Institute (Grace Muriuki and Karen Hussey) and the School of Public Health (Lisa Schubert) recently published a working paper on ‘Urban food systems’ emphasising the importance of food security in the planning agenda of local governments. Urban Food Systems in Australian Cities_Background-compile Continue reading